Education Myths…#11

Myth #11 (of 12): Bloom is no longer relevant

Any organization, teacher, trainer or instructor who focuses on ‘noun’ objectives (see myth #10) can’t help but only focus on the cognitive domain. However, if you only focus on the cognitive domain, learners may have trouble in finding value in the material that is being covered. “In spite of the wide acceptance of Bloom’s taxonomy, educators have largely ignored the affective domain, focusing instead on the cognitive.” (Bolin, 2005)  “What is the ‘value’ in learning this information/skill?” “Why are we studying this?” “How is it relevant to my situation?” Whether stated in class, or with colleagues at lunch, or with family at night, these statements resonate around the globe.

The reason most young people (certainly in the West) want to get a license is – for freedom. To go driving in your own car (or borrow the parents car if still at home) is a huge step in independence. Therefore, the affective goal of getting a license is to feel independent and seen as a pseudo right-of-passage to growing up. The socio-motor goal is to drive safely (usually to keep tickets and insurance costs low), thus the need to learn to drive in various conditions and terrains. The cognitive goal is to pass the test. But the cognitive needs the affective for motivation and the socio-motor to pass the practical aspects of the test. Whether you realize it or not, we utilize all three domains in our personal lives here in the 21st Century.

21st Century Bloom: A few years ago I decided to delve into Bloom and see what the recent literature had to say. They all had some interesting ideas and a few researchers had developed updated versions. Instead of having to choose a version of Bloom to fit my situation, I decided to compile all the versions into one table per domain.(bloom DOMAIN+TABLES) This document consists of three pages – one table for each domain – but uses some of the newer terminology to describe each level. Too simplify things, I used different color text in the tables that corresponds with the source citation at the bottom of each page.

I then proceeded to generate a few ‘training’ videos on how to best utilize these tables when planning course/lesson outcomes. I selected the topic of ‘giving a presentation’ as these skills are needed across all education systems and require a heavy does of all three domains. Given that outcomes are the core reason for the existence of any lesson/course/program, writing them should take the most time and effort.

Final Thought: From Sandy Welton (link to discussion)
-If you tell someone how to do something, does this mean they know it?
-If you show someone how to do something, does this mean they can do it?
-If someone knows how to do something, does this mean they will do it?

 

Education Myths….#1   Education Myths….#2   Education Myths….#3

Education Myths….#4   Education Myths….#5   Education Myths….#6

Education Myths….#7   Education Myths….#8   Education Myths….#9

Education Myths….#10  Education Myths….#11  Education Myths….#12

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3 thoughts on “Education Myths…#11

  1. Pingback: Education Myths…#1 | cartereducation.net

  2. Pingback: Education Myths…#12 | cartereducation.net

  3. Pingback: Education Myths…#10 | cartereducation.net

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